Organic Gardening:
How To Create Your Own Healthy Garden

Some tips on how to start with your own organic garden makes a great start for beginners. Below are some tips that will hopefully assist you into making better decisions and to start applying things to your garden properly. You need to work hard, so it is to your benefit to learn something from these tips.

When first growing a garden, attempt to put as much effort into the first bed as possible. Land that hasn't been used for a while needs an overhaul to begin changing into a viable spot for plants. Usually these regions either lack the right nutrients or consistency of soil. If you plan to make a garden out of patch, make sure that it has all the right pre-conditions to planting.

Treat your roses! To naturally remedy black spots on roses in your organic garden, use milk! For some unknown reason - using a 1:2 ratio mixture of milk and water - has been shown to get rid of black spots! Use a spray bottle to apply the mixture directly to the leaves of the affected plant.

Embrace earthworms in the organic garden! Earthworms are an organic gardener's best friend. Through tunneling and their nitrogen-rich castings, they can help to aerate the soil. This improves the amount of oxygen that gets to a plant's roots, improves water retention capacity, and keeps the soil loose and workable. They actually raise much-needed minerals from the garden's subsoil to the topsoil, where plants can get the greatest benefit. These worms also break up hardpan soil, which is detrimental to root growth.

To control weeds in your garden without using chemical herbicides around your organic plants, mulch between rows with bark, clean straw, mulch-covered newspapers, or sawdust from untreated wood. Beware of using anything to mulch or fertilize that might contain seeds that can add more weeds, such as grass clippings or fresh manure.

Sometimes it's helpful to spread grass clippings or other kinds of decomposing plant matter around your plants. The plants will decompose and allow their nutrients to go back into the soil. This same theory works for many kinds of decomposing matter such as rotten apples, eggs, and pretty much everything else that can be considered organic matter.

Get rid of slugs and snails in the organic garden. As small as they are, slugs and snails can eat entire plants in one night. They thrive in moist conditions below 75 degrees. The best (and possibly most humane way) is to use beer traps to rid your garden of slugs and snails. Simply place stale beer in a shallow pan, the lip of which should be at ground level. The slugs and snails are attracted to the beer and will crawl in. This way they will leave this world happy and inebriated.

It can help if you mulch or add composting material to your plant beds or trees with 3" of organic material - it can help conserve water, it will discourage weeds from growing and it adds humus to your garden or plants. It also creates a nice, neat appearance to your flower beds and around trees.

If your garden is in the city, there are a few things you can do to lessen city noise. Try putting a water feature in your garden like a waterfall or fountain. This will create white noise that will deaden the effects of traffic noise. Add wind chimes, if you like, for additional distraction.

Your plants need to grow in a rich soil. You can buy bags of soil but they can be quite expensive. You can also easily create your own: you need to use perlite, vermiculite and peat in equal quantities. You should also add a small quantity of lime and compost if needed.

Protect your compost pile from the weather, in wet climates, consider building a little roof or cover to protect your compost pile from the rain, or cover it with a plastic tarp. You don't want the pile to become waterlogged, or have the nutrients leach out from excessive water run-off.

When planting your tomato seedlings in your organic garden, you should plant them up to the first true leaves, which will bury the stem. The reason is because new roots will sprout on these buried stems. The more roots there are in a seedling, the more fruit it will produce.

While Mother Nature will eventually do the work needed to create compost from a backyard pile, even if it is not actively tended, you can give her a helping hand by adding compost starter to the mix. Compost starters, available from the garden centers, add microorganisms to the soil that help speed up the decay process.


A great tip that can help improve your organic gardening is to start keeping a gardening journal. Noting all of the changes that occur and when they occur, can be great information to have. A gardening journal can help your next year of gardening be much more successful.

Avoid chemicals in your garden. Keep the toxins out of the food and the water supply. One of the best parts about organic gardening is eliminating chemical compounds from your food supply. There are many alternatives to chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Almost any problem can be cured with the right management.

If you have aphids on your plants, and do not want to use harmful bug sprays, you can use soapy water. A very diluted soapy water can be sprayed on all areas of the plant, the leaves, stems and buds. After you spray the soapy water, spray with clean water. This will get the aphids off your plants.

While you often just throw your waste organic matter from cooking away, how about composting all of this so you can add it to your garden once it is decomposed into soil with tons of nutrients. This will give your organic garden the boost that it needs to surpass chemical fertilizers!

These tips should have given you some much needed insight on where to start and how to begin growing your own personal organic garden. These tips were thoughtfully compiled to help the new organic gardener learn the basics and some other cool techniques that are simple enough to use for their garden.

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